Saturday, October 13, 2007

10/13/07: What is this?


What is this and how was it done? Take your guesses in the comments section -- see if you can tell me what I did to make this image. I'll reveal the answers in tomorrow's post.


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7 Comments:

Anonymous Fyse said...

OK, here's my stab at it. It's a single long exposure (30-60 seconds?). The lights and chandelier in the room are on at first, and the camera is panned round so they're in shot, before these lights are turned off. A few people then wander round the darkened space, illuminated intermittently by someone else popping flashguns at them.

Am I even close?

6:24 PM, October 13, 2007  
Anonymous Fyse said...

Hmmm... That was an initial guess based on a brief look, and I now see things that perhaps suggest multiple exposures.

In short, I don't know...

6:32 PM, October 13, 2007  
Blogger Mattp9 said...

Multiple exposure with flash pops. On my Pentax K10D I can do several exposures and the in-camera hw does the combining. Not sure how you would do this on a C/N.

7:58 PM, October 13, 2007  
Blogger gdphoto said...

Its a first dance of a bride and groom. The camera is set for a long exposure on a tripod, at first, due to the low ambient light. You then walked around with a flash and fired it from 5 different locations....hence the 5 star burst white lights. The camera was then removed from the tripod pprior to closing the shutter.

Cool effect, great image!

8:29 PM, October 13, 2007  
Anonymous MsB said...

I think you hand-held it either usinh the Night button on your DSLR, or in manual mode with a slow shutter speed at 800 or 1600 ISO?

11:02 PM, October 13, 2007  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Rear-curtain sync with slow shutter speed and bounced flash.

2:16 AM, October 14, 2007  
Blogger Jenifer Sellon said...

My guess - you have the camera mounted on a tripod. You start the long exposure and pan slowly from left to right, then start firing the off-camera strobe multiple times to stop the action, but not before you created the 'dragging' light effect. It seems like it is all one long exposure, rather than multiples, but that is just my guess.

7:18 AM, October 14, 2007  

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